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Women's History   Tags: feminism, suffrage, women, womens history  

Explore women's heritage and contributions with these books and resources.
Last Updated: Feb 28, 2014 URL: http://hottopics.lvccld.org/womens_history Print Hot Topic RSS Updates

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Emmeline Pankhurst (center) leading a protest march, July 1915. Pankhurst and other feminists voice...

Emmeline Pankhurst (center) leading a protest march, July 1915. Pankhurst and other feminists voice...

The women’s movement has often been called one of the most important social movements of the twentieth century. Its most basic goals are to improve women’s social, economic, and political conditions by facilitating personal transformations, introducing new ideas to public discourse, and exerting pressure on policymakers. In addition to voting, it has been a key form of women’s political participation, joined only recently by greater numbers of women in political office. Beyond these basic features, however, there is considerable diversity among specific women’s movements around the world. First, not all types of political engagement by women would be considered a...View More

Women rallying for equal rights

Women rallying for equal rights

This entry includes 2 subentries: The Nineteenth Century
The Twentieth Century
During the Colonial era and the first decades of the Republic, there were always women who strove to secure equal rights for themselves. Some assumed the business interests of a husband after his death. A few women challenged male domination of religious life, though they met with criticism from their communities—or banishment, as in the case of Anne Hutchinson. Women were also active in the fight against the Crown and organized boycotts of British goods. During the struggle for independence, prominent females such as Abigail Adams wrote and spoke... View More

Members of the National Women's Party picket the White House in 1917.

Members of the National Women's Party picket the White House in 1917.

With few exceptions, women were not allowed to vote before the twentieth century. In 1900, however, only twenty-five nations held regular elections for at least some of their political leaders, and only six recognized the right of suffrage for most of their adult male citizens. Several American states and territorial governments granted women voting rights between 1855 and the 1890s; Sweden and Great Britain offered a limited right in local elections to some women in the 1860s; but New Zealand in 1893 was the first to guarantee a national right of woman’s suffrage. About two dozen European nations as well...View More

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